asker

hythrain asked: The other day I saw your tweets about how a lot of the female empowerment message is mediated through guys. I agree with this completely, but I'm also concerned. Why? Well, I'm a guy myself and I want to be a writer. For years I've been improving on my writing of female characters and trying to make empowered female characters and spread that message. What are things I should avoid to make the message come out more properly and not filtered?

gailsimone:

I often get this nagging feeling that because I am talking about women and female characters and female creators so much, people might think I automatically have something against male creators.

I don’t. Every new writer is a blank slate to me, everyone gets a fair shot. Everyone is capable of doing good work until they show otherwise.

The gender someone calls themselves doesn’t bestow any magic powers or insight or ability. Some of the best writers of female characters identify as male and some of the worst do not. I would rather read a Greg Rucka female than a female by a merely average female author.

The fact that this is a concern to you is a good sign. Hopefully, it’s not JUST women characters that you want to represent well, because there are lots of other groups that have historically been marginalized and stereotyped as well.

It’s just that historically, a lot of the tropes of female characters have been repeated so endlessly that it is painful to the female reader.

Some things I hope people watch out for…

1) The Perfect Everything. Often, we see guys write female characters as without flaws. This isn’t really what we want…look at the books that have huge female audiences. We do not tend to embrace the perfect woman who never makes a mistake. You can make your females have flaws, just be honest about it and avoid making them similar to stereotypes of the past.

2) The Character With No Steering Wheel. Even more often, we see women who have no agency and no direction or motive of their own. These characters are solely dependent on following a man. I am not saying never write this person, but keep in mind if that is a character YOU would enjoy reading about.

3) The Mystery Of Woman is Bullshit. I hate this trope, the woman who is supposed to represent what mysterious, sexy, tantalizing but unknowable creatures women are. It’s a staple of noir fiction, and it always sucks. Women aren’t treasure maps.

There’s a lot more but that may help a bit. Good luck!

batbcomic:

Hm, wonder what this upcoming title might be? 
Cover art not final

Bootcamper Megan Kearney is putting out her first book! yayyy!

batbcomic:

Hm, wonder what this upcoming title might be? 

Cover art not final

Bootcamper Megan Kearney is putting out her first book! yayyy!

asker

Anonymous asked: what's the best way to get into the comics industry?

jamesasmus:

dshalv:

kierongillen:

Take a piece of paper, fold it up, draw a comic on it and sell it to someone.

I’m not being nearly as facetious as you may suspect. Comics’ democratic nature is one of its bigger pluses.

Too true.

^fact. Actually creating and spreading comics makes you a comic creator and part of the industry. If you keep doing personal, interesting work - more and more people will notice.

I add a word of caution: If you just make carbon copies of things that are already out though, or try to emulate the generic default model of mainstream superhero books - your efforts will be more likely to get lost in the shuffle .

asker

riftwarrior asked: As someone hoping to eventually write at least ONE book, I'm facing a conundrum... I had something I wrote last year, ended up not liking the way I wrote it out, rewrote it for NaNoWriMo, found it more acceptable and then I just... stopped. Any tips on getting over a hurdle like that? It's not that I don't have things to write for it, just that I can't get past this one annoying point... Feel like an RPG character facing a wall and my pathway is fixed so I can't just go around it.

rosalarian:

I’m gonna kick your ass a little bit here.

Are you writing because you want to be a writer, or do you have a story to tell? Nothing wrong with writing for the sake of writing. It’s excellent practice. But it’s not always gonna be the best motivator for getting results.

I reeeeeeally want to be able to do the splits. I’ll work at it for a while, and then forget about it, because I realize I want to do the splits only if I don’t have to work at it. Really wanting to do the splits isn’t enough. I don’t have follow-through in that area. It doesn’t hold my interest long enough to accomplish it. There’s other things in my life I’d rather be doing.

But when it comes to my comics and writing, that’s what I actually want to do. I have so many stories to tell. I have something I want to say. I am willing to work at it, even when it isn’t fun. Because it’s often not fun. There are long parts of this job that are super boring. It gets done because I don’t stop. If something isn’t working, I find a different way to do it. There’s always another way to go at a story.

So first ask yourself why you’re writing this book. If it’s for the sake of being able to say you wrote a book, then just keep typing words until you have collected a lot of them and then write “the end.” But if you’re writing the book because you have something to say, then say it. Sit down and say the thing you wanted to say. It’s hard, but again, it’s work.

If you can’t write past this one annoying point, readers are even less likely to get past that point. If you’ve written yourself into a corner, back up. Keep hitting delete until you’re at a point where a character making a different choice leads to something more interesting that you actually want to write again. You might have to abandon some of the plans you had for its future. It happens.

Your path is never fixed when it comes to writing a book, because you can literally rewrite its history. Be patient. You’re not famous yet and there’s no editors hounding you with a deadline or fans demanding the next book in the series. You haven’t published anything yet so there’s no worrying about having to retcon something. Just write your story and don’t tell yourself these hurdles can’t be overcome. Don’t let yourself make excuses like that.

fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn:

A glorious fuck-ton of sensual/sexy kissing references (per request).

Just as a tip; notice how the lips either fit one on top of the other (making a zig zag from the side view) or they press against each other to compress the typical lip shape. (Sorry, I tried! This was a bitch to compile; there are no good kissing references out there. I’m still looking. If I find any more, I’ll post ‘em. Fuck; I’m done for the day.)

[NOTICE: The bottom three images are GIFs. Wait for them to load.]

(via rosengeist)

For those of you not on Facebook, here’s the info:
“APPLY ONLINE HERE:https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1kU7yQebymhlIJha19XvasiLdBUXNHylb2gPYrBb7EzM/viewform
COMICS FOR THE PEOPLE With Kwentong Bayan: Labour of Love MONDAYs 6-8pm April-May Gladstone, Queenslandne Library***ASL interpretation will be provided depending on interest***Kwentong Bayan: Labour of Love is a community based comic book project, created by Toronto-based artists Althea Balmes (Illustrator) and Jo SiMalaya Alcampo (Writer). Their workshop will use comic books as a way to highlight the realities or our various experiences, of community and friendship, love and struggle, and individuals empowerment. You will gain skills and knowledge in the various ways to develop and create comics and the stories within them. These are the stories that rarely make mainstream media or academic research.——————————————————-<♥>—————————————————-FLAME is a series of FREE ART programs for LGBTQ2S* Spectrum youth under 29, that is rooted in self care and community building. We want more spaces to make art, to share our stories and also to celebrate our work!! There is an understanding on taking part in the program that we will all be working to creating safer spaces and to support each other as we aim to have good respectful relationships with ourselves and othersEach program runs once a week for 2 hours for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the 6 weeks, participants will be able to organize a collaborative event that will show and highlight their work. There is only room for 15 participants/program, and it is expected that individuals will show up to 80% of the workshopsEach Participant will receive a small honorarium of $50 at the completion of the workshop series.”
(found here on Facebook)

For those of you not on Facebook, here’s the info:

APPLY ONLINE HERE:https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1kU7yQebymhlIJha19XvasiLdBUXNHylb2gPYrBb7EzM/viewform


COMICS FOR THE PEOPLE 
With Kwentong Bayan: Labour of Love 
MONDAYs 6-8pm April-May Gladstone, Queenslandne Library
***ASL interpretation will be provided depending on interest***

Kwentong Bayan: Labour of Love is a community based comic book project, created by Toronto-based artists Althea Balmes (Illustrator) and Jo SiMalaya Alcampo (Writer). Their workshop will use comic books as a way to highlight the realities or our various experiences, of community and friendship, love and struggle, and individuals empowerment. You will gain skills and knowledge in the various ways to develop and create comics and the stories within them. These are the stories that rarely make mainstream media or academic research.

——————————————————-<♥>—————————————————-

FLAME is a series of FREE ART programs for LGBTQ2S* Spectrum youth under 29, that is rooted in self care and community building. We want more spaces to make art, to share our stories and also to celebrate our work!! 

There is an understanding on taking part in the program that we will all be working to creating safer spaces and to support each other as we aim to have good respectful relationships with ourselves and others

Each program runs once a week for 2 hours for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the 6 weeks, participants will be able to organize a collaborative event that will show and highlight their work. 

There is only room for 15 participants/program, and it is expected that individuals will show up to 80% of the workshops

Each Participant will receive a small honorarium of $50 at the completion of the workshop series.”

(found here on Facebook)

Ty can’t stop teaching even when he’s not in a classroom…  At Toronto ComiCon 2014, someone asked him about a possible class on perspective, which launched a ten minute lesson! (“I promise you—this is SO much easier than you think!”).

But…we are talking to a local comics pro about teaching a class (Ty doesn’t have the time to create a new class right now).

TWO SPACES LEFT in Heads, Hands and Faces

http://comicbookbootcamp.com/upcoming-classes-march-april-2014/

HEADS, HANDS AND FACES 

DATES:  Wednesdays, 7 – 10pm, March 12 – April 23 2014

PRICE:  $325  (for students who have taken this class before, and would like to repeat it, the price is $275) Payment accepted by cash, cheque or PayPal (There will be a fee for NSF cheques).

REGISTRATION/INQUIRES:  email comicbookbootcamp@gmail.com, or call us at 905-822-2961 to book a space, and to make payment arrangements. Please note that spaces are limited for each class; registration is on a first-come first-reserved basis.

MATERIALS:  Bring paper or a sketchbook, pencils and erasers. If you prefer to use a laptop for notes, bring that. 

sketchbook 37

The complex anatomy of the face and hands made simple in this seven week workshop. We will cover the skeletal forms, muscles, movements, lighting and expressions of these often difficult body parts.

sketchbook 34